Published on November 17, 2016

family eating dinner

Gratitude during the holidays

The holidays tend to be especially busy for many people with parties to plan, dinners to make, special church or school activities to attend and family to visit. With so much going on, it can be a chaotic and stressful time. This holiday season take a few minutes to reflect on the people you love and appreciate and the opportunities you have been given in life. Making gratitude a regular habit can lead to lower blood pressure, less anxiety and depression, and fewer addictions, according to emerging research.

Answer these questions to help you grow your attitude of gratitude during the holidays:

Who in your life has given you inspiration, motivation, love, support or guidance?
These people can be family, friends, teachers, mentors, or colleagues. Take a moment to acknowledge them and give thanks.

Where have you been that has deeply affected you emotionally, intellectually, physically or spiritually?
In what ways have experiences positively influenced your life? The places you visited and the people you met may have helped shape who you are today.

How do you normally express your gratitude?
Do you express gratitude daily? It is easy to forget to say thank you because our lives are so busy. Make it a habit at least twice a day to pause and say thank you.

What negative situation could be a positive in your life?
Life isn't perfect, but inside every negative experience is a positive experience waiting to happen. The process of removing negativity creates the opportunity for growth and transformation.

Love + Medicine

Every day, Gundersen Health System delivers great medicine plus a little something extra—we call it Love + Medicine.

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